In the Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan

Ten thousand people: the number reported dead on Sunday matched almost exactly the number we saw filing past the Cenotaph in London at the Service of Remembrance. The number of dead and missing in the Philippines continues to rise. We can’t just shake our heads and mouth our horror: there, but for the grace of God, go all of us. We have to help, or stand condemned by our own passivity.

What is the purpose of life?

Debris hang on basketball post near thousands of houses damaged after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city

Last year, my husband and I went to see “The Impossible.” It’s a movie, based on a true story, that follows a single family in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. It was an intense yet inspiring movie, as the way each family member survived and reunited was nothing short of miraculous. At the end, however, both my husband and I had the same response. “What about everyone else?”

We both clearly remembered the tsunami; we were in India at the time. Whole regions along the coast where my husband grew up (Chennai) were devastated by the surging waves. Over 220,000 people died, making it one of the most tragic earthquakes/tsunamis in history. Deaths were reported as far away as 5,000 miles from the quake’s epicenter. I guess after a movie that portrayed such an intense happening, we had expected some sort of reference to the…

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3 thoughts on “In the Aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan

  1. Our daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren were in an F4 tornado five years ago that damaged 85% of their small town and destroyed half of it. It was a terrifying tornado followed by months of living elsewhere and struggling to rebuild. But what is happening with Typhoon Haiyan is inconceivable; the destruction and loss of life is heartbreaking, and it will be many years before much of it can be rebuilt.
    The prayer you posted is beautiful.

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